Since we haven't read the book yet, please watch this trailer and predict what kind of issues might be raised in this book regarding privacy? Why is privacy important or not important in Henrietta's case? Make a thoughtful comment below.
 


Comments

Jayme Reyna
09/18/2013 3:46pm

Perhaps the reason why privacy was not important in Henrietta's case was because the African American Civil Rights Movement had barely began and had yet to make a powerful impact in the United States. The doctors proabaly did not care about Henrietta's privacy because she had no rights at the time they took the samples from her and thus did not bother to inform her or her family.

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Patrick Barmann
09/18/2013 5:12pm

Privacy is important in the medical industry, doctors aren't allowed to share information on patients with out consent. The medical industry used this to their advantage by not telling the Lacks family about Henrietta's cell and didn't give the Lacks family any compensation from Henrietta's contribution to science. Although her information wasn't shared to her family, it was shared with other scientists and doctors which is violates doctor patient confidentiality. I think that the issues that might be raised will be that people, and corporations, use privacy policies to their fiscal advantage.

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Karina J. Ramirez
09/18/2013 6:49pm

The issue of privacy in the book I believe will be as P. Barmann stated above Doctor Patient confidentiality.
I believe Henrietta's privacy was violated, but it lead to so many new discoveries that helped medical science. Even though I believe everyone's privacy is important, in the case of Henrietta I believe the doctors were right to look deeper into her tumor. If they didn't, what would be of medicine today?

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Anthony Hinojosa
09/18/2013 9:03pm

From what the previous said, the doctor-patient confidentiality will definitely be a brought up issue, as well as the monetary gain form Henrietta's predicament and how none of it went towards her family. Privacy is important, but in this case the fact that they learned so much from her case makes privacy a minuscule matter, especially in the time that it happened, privacy wasn't a #1 concern for these people.

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Crystal NesSmith
09/18/2013 9:32pm

Henrietta's privacy was obviously not very important to the doctors at Johns Hopkins. It could have been due to multiple things like her ethnicity, her occupation as a farmer, or even due to the fact that privacy laws were not really a concern 1951. I think the book will focus on the fact that Henrietta and her family had no idea the cells had even been taken and were being used until several years after Henrietta's death. Which raises the question of how many other people are having their privacy violated without knowing it?

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Jacob Blanton
09/18/2013 10:02pm

I think that the doctors were right into looking further into the cells.It really helped the development in medicine. But at least they should have told her family what they found and what they were doing and how it would help society.

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Taylor Reyes
09/18/2013 10:29pm

Taking the cells was definitely a benefit to society, the fact that they did not tell the family what had been done and how the cells were being used was wrong however. Clearly whether the family was aware of what had been done or not it still would not change anything, but then it brings further questions like how many times have they done this to other patients without consent in the past and up until now? I think the book will focus on the fact that her privacy was invaded and this has probably happened multiple times to different patients and families.

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Trinidad Cervera
09/18/2013 10:37pm

Today society has a much deeper concern for privacy that in Henrietta's time it was not as important as it is now. Maybe that is why the doctors took advantage of Henrietta and invaded her privacy. Also Henrietta might of not known what her rights were since it was the first hospital to treat African Americans and she was a easy target. Not saying it was ok for the doctors to invade her privacy but with out her cells who knows if medicine would of ever advanced.

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Chevelle Doane
09/19/2013 9:59am

Privacy is very important. In the Medical Industry it is even more important. I think they violated her rights of privacy. They should have notified her or made or aware that they took samples.

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Kiran Kaur
09/19/2013 10:23am

So the difference between her time and ours does play somewhat of a role in her case but either way her privacy was invaded. She had the right to know what was going on. Even if they weren't really harming her in any way.

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Chrisitian Garibay
09/19/2013 10:28am

I think this shows how important privacy really is. One thing that people can really rely on to be private is the conversations between them and their doctor. Doctors and hospitals are supposed to keep things private. This wasn't the case for Henrietta Lacks. This was in the start of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. She didnt really have much rights so doctors and surgeons took advantage of her. It helped develop medicine we have today, but it came with a price of one Henrietta Lacks

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Olisaemeka Igweze
09/19/2013 10:28am

I don't agree with the breach in confidentiality that the doctors did. I agree that the discoveries were very important and helpful to others but basic rules and laws should not be thrown away without any punitive measures taken. For those saying that "in this case, it was okay since the doctors learned so much from her case," That type of thinking should not be encouraged. It is basically an "ends justify the means" type of thinking and it is flawed. What type of world would we live in if the cops were able to barge into anyone's house without a warrant because they thought there drugs inside. Protocol should always be followed.

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09/19/2013 3:36pm

Excellent analogy and connection.

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Jasmin Cahue
09/19/2013 10:29am

In the 1950's African American still didn't have very many rights and it was wrong for the doctors to take her family's cells 20 years later to experiment on them as well.

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Jazmin Reyes
09/19/2013 10:30am

Henrietta's privacy was violated when the doctors decided to look deeper within her tumor, but the ending results are splendid since it helped out by finding new advanced medicines to help control bad cells.

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Aldo Escobar
09/19/2013 10:31am

Its really unprofessional that the doctors didn't notify Henrietta's family about her condition much sooner, but instead kept performing test on her. The testing part is not the downside it was a medical discovery of its own. The part of not telling the family is the negative of this situation.

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Sergio Alvarado Jr
09/19/2013 10:31am

This shows at privacy even then was also an issue. Patient medical records and the confidentiality between a patient and doctor is always thought to be private ,but in the case of Henrietta Lack her information was shared with companies and corporations for their fiscal gains.

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Kiran Kaur
09/19/2013 10:32am

I'd like to add that privacy is important in her case because regardless of what they were doing, they were her cells and she had the right to know.

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Janet Lopez
09/19/2013 10:32am

Privacy is very important. I imagine if someone invaded my privacy, what would I do? I don't know, but I think that no one has the right to invade other peoples privacy. Henrietta was suppose to know about what was going on.

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Shelbi Castro
09/19/2013 10:32am

In that time era, privacy was not much of an issue. During the time of the civil rights movement, Henrietta was an African American women who did not have any rights. Doctors were able to take her cells and use them without her consent. Although this better advanced medicine, Henrietta was not asked for permission to use what belonged to her.

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Angel Martinez
09/19/2013 10:34am

Hennrieta's privacy was completely obliterated, her doctors basically did not inform the family after her death and did continuous amount of research. Her, and the families, rights were not even taken to consideration until 25 years later when they decided to inform the family about their research. I believe they didn't notify the family based on the time period they were in.

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Isaac Martinez
09/19/2013 10:34am

Though the biggest issue known is the one involving the doctor and patient confidentiality, we must also look at the time that this was all happening. There was a different set of rules in approximately the 50's-80's. Since Henrietta was also African American she was not given as much rights.

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Cassidy McCool
09/19/2013 10:35am

A lot of things have changed from now and Henrietta's time. One of those is our privacy in the medical field. If taking the cells from Henrietta were going to benefit society she should have had the right to know.

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Gerardo Chavez
09/19/2013 10:37am

In regards to privacy, in the Henrietta Lacks medical case, the question if Lack's physician to patient privilege was violated is raised. In accordance, to present laws and medical protocol, Lack's privacy privilege was violated by her physician. The fact that Henrietta Lacks is an African American, in the 1950's, at a time when civil rights for African Americans were overlooked might have played a role as to why Lack's privacy privilege was infringed by here physician.

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Phillip Campos
09/19/2013 10:38am

It was very wrong for those doctors to invade Lacks's privacy and sell her cells for their profit without even notifying her. Lacks should've read the document she signed. I think the doctors took advantage of her because of her race and the era this happened.

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Adrian Panduro
09/19/2013 10:39am

In the 1950's African Americans didn't have much Civil Rights they didn't have much privacy. For example, her privacy was invaded by the Doctors. Privacy is very important but if the Doctor had her consent to release her cells then it's ok. Her cells were a big part in medicine so something good did come out of it.

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Maria Silva
09/19/2013 10:39am

Even though it was wrong how they went about it but it made advancement in medicine but along with the time frame that African Americans did not have the same rights and because of her ethnicity and her background they took advantage of that. They should have notify the family and given them some sort of compensation.

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Oscar Jimenez
09/19/2013 10:42am

It was wrong for the doctors to not notify Henrietta's family that they were using her cells to lead to all these medical breakthroughs, but her cells did bring a lot of good to the medical field.

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Angel Martinez
09/19/2013 10:44am

Like i said in class, the video specifies the jargon they use in the process of the application adding that we are too lazy to read the whole contract. Once we agree to their terms they have consent to all our privacies and take advantage of some sort.

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Adrian Panduro
09/19/2013 10:44am

In the 1950's African Americans had little to no Civil Rights so people would take advantage of them. For example, Lacks was taken advantage by the doctor who released her cells and made money off of it. Regardless if she signed a contract she was still taken advantage of due to the fact that they did that without her consent.

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09/23/2013 7:09pm

From the video, I think the book is going to be about private policy and patient-doctor confidentiality. It seems that Henrietta Lacks was taken advantage of by the medical facility due to the fact that she was African American and poor. Maybe the hospital figured they could get away with using her cells for advancement in science, but it is still wrong to not even get the consent from her or her family.

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Ahlam Khalid
09/24/2013 12:31am

Just by watching this short trailer about The Immortal Life of Henrieta Lacks, I could already tell that there's a big issue regarding privacy and legal rights. During the 1950, African -Americans pretty much didn't have equal rights nor did they have any privacy, that's why it didn't surprise me but, understanding the issue related to Henrietta is something unusual and the doctors have gone too far. It was very selfish and ignorant of the medical industry to keep silent about the billion dollar cancer cell, which if her family knew ahead of time, it would of maybe helped them; not money wise but just knowing what Henrietta left behind was somewhat a miracle for others. In Henrietta's case, I believe that it was definitely wrong and that the medical industry intentionally neglected her by having procedures done to her without her knowledge. She was never informed and her family also had no recognition until the 1970s, which leaves me wondering how devastated her family could be after understanding this information 20 years later....

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